Photos

View More

Bookmark and Share

Athletes show their pride at Opening Ceremony

July 20, 2010

Photo

The Special Olympics flag being raised during the Opening Ceremony Sunday afternoon
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Photos arranged by Chelsey Criner at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Find pictures of your state: (all photos are by students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Alabama
Photo by Andrea Evers
Alaska
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Arizona
Photo by Dora Lopez
Arkansas
Photo by Dora Lopez
California
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Colorado
Photo by Andrea Evers
Connecticut
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
District of Columbia
Photo by Dora Lopez
Deleware
Photo by Emily Sallach
Florida
Photo by Emily Sallach
Georgia
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Idaho
Photo by Emily Sallach
Illinois
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Indiana
Photos by Andrea Evers
Iowa
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Kansas
Photo by Emily Sallach
Kentucky
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Louisiana
Photo by Emily Sallach
Maine
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Maryland
Photo by Emily Sallach
Massachusetts
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Michigan
Photo by Andrea Evers
Minnesota
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Mississippi
Photo by Emily Sallach
Missouri
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Montana
Photo by Emily Sallach
Nebraska
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Nevada
Photo by Emily Sallach
New Hampshire
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
New Jersey
Photo by Emily Sallach
New Mexico
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
New York
Photo by Andrea Evers
North Carolina
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
North Dakota
Photo by Emily Sallach
Ohio
Photo by Dora Lopez
Oklahoma
Photo by Emily Sallach
Oregon
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Pennsylvania
Photo by Emily Sallach
Rhode Island
Photo by Emily Sallach
South Carolina
Photo by Emily Sallach
South Dakota
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Tennessee
Photo by Dora Lopez
Texas
Photo by Emily Sallach
Utah
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Vermont
Photo by Emily Sallach
Virginia
Photo by Emily Sallach
Washington
Photo by Andrea Evers
West Virginia
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Wisconsin
Photo by Emily Sallach
Wyoming
Photo by Dora Lopez



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Flag football sees intense second day of action

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska Red quarterback Zach Taylor runs the ball against Texas. Texas won 25-14.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska White advances the ball against New Jersey. New Jersey won the game 27-22.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

New Jersey player Joey Clawson dances as the crowd sings “Happy Birthday” to him. Clawson is from Trenton, NJ, and turned 22 today.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska Red quarterback Zach Taylor, 17 from West Point, NE, looks to throw a pass against Arkansas. Nebraska Red won 18-12 in overtime.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Arkansas player Daniel Allen, 22 from Lonoke, AR, watches the action against Nebraska Red from the sideline.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Indiana Bulletz’s Corbin Coffey scores a touchdown against Arizona.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Arizona players watch the game against the Indiana Bulletz from the sideline.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Missouri players pray before the game against Tennessee.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Indiana Bulletz player Ben McCarty forces a fumble against Charlie Milby of the Texas Rattlers.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Indiana Bulletz’s Corbin Coffey runs the ball against the Texas Rattlers.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska White player Rick Bergman (left) moves the ball against Arkansas player Chris Martin (right). Arkansas won 22-12.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Missouri and Arizona players chase down a pass. Missouri won 27-22.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Indiana Kats’ Craig Simmons (left) and New Jersey’s Steven Rodenbeck (right) leap for the ball.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Indiana Kats player Brooke Sawyer runs the ball against New Jersey. New Jersey won 26-12.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tennessee Thunder’s Kevin Evans tries to advance the ball against Indiana Kats. The Thunder won 22-20.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tennessee Thunder quarterback Cedric Fletcher searches for a receiver against Missouri. Missouri won 40-22.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska White Head Coach John Manna watches his team play Arkansas from the sideline.

Photo

Photo by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Arkansas players Steve East (left), 21 from Lonoke, AR, and Antonio Nelson (right), 18 from Pine Bluff, AR, walk off the field together after the game against Nebraska White.



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Volleyball All Stars hit the court

Photo

Athletes on the White All Stars team celebrate their win.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Rory Fox, coach of the Red All Stars, claps for athlete Ryan Landry of Texas as he is introduced to the crowd

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

All Star Jackie Krei from Team North Dakota serves the ball.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Raishaun Holloway from Team Connecticut receives his certificate after winning the 2010 Special Olympics All Star volleyball game.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Texan aims for gold in swim lanes

Photo

Chan Graves, 25, came all the way from Arlington Texas, to compete in the 2010 Special Olympics USA Nationals. Chan said in 2002 he broke records in a College Station, Texas competition and walked away with four gold medals. On July 20, he competed in the Men’s 100 Freestyle. He qualified and will swim again Wednesday with nine teammates.
Photo by Brittany Stark, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

We are using embedded Flash videos please update your Flash Player. If using a mobile device you can access content from a mobile download located below.


download Download Video:mobilewebbroadcast
Chan Graves, 25 of Arlington, Texas qualifies, competes again Wednesday


Tags: , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Florida athlete garners Texas support

July 19, 2010

We are using embedded Flash videos please update your Flash Player. If using a mobile device you can access content from a mobile download located below.


download Download Video:mobilewebbroadcast

Video and Photos: Marcus Scheer, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Florida soccer athlete Jessie Fusilier has arrived in Lincoln with more than just a will to score goals. His grandparents from Orange, Texas have driven to Nebraska to watch Jessie compete in the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games.



Tags: , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Shriver lets Special Olympics athletes define themselves

July 18, 2010

We are using embedded Flash videos please update your Flash Player. If using a mobile device you can access content from a mobile download located below.


download Download Video:mobilewebbroadcast

Video by Emily Walkenhorst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Flag football scrimmage sets stage for the week’s competition

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Doug Derby, 39, a member of the Nebraska White team, takes time to rest between warm-ups during his team’s scrimmage.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A football sits on the sidelines as teams warm up. The 10 teams ran drills and stretched before scrimmaging.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Missouri team calls for a huddle between drills. Teams showed their unity in their on-the-field play and during warm-ups.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Texas unified team sets up for a play during its scrimmage against the Indiana Bulletz unified team. Unified teams are groups in which Special Olympics athletes are paired on a team with individuals without intellectual disabilities.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Missouri team takes a water break between warm-up drills. Coaches and Special Olympics volunteers encourage athletes and spectators to stay hydrated during the week because of expected high temperatures.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Indiana Bulletz team runs a few pre-game drills before its scrimmage.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Indiana Kats and Tennessee Thunder face off in their first scrimmage game. Both teams are competing as traditional teams with all members being Special Olympics athletes.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Richard Benz, 21, is a member of the Tennessee Thunder team, which played the Indiana Kats in the first scrimmage of the day.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A Tennessee Thunder coach helps one of his players adjust the flags between plays.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Tennessee Thunder calls for a team huddle between plays. Tennessee Thunder played the Indiana Kats during a scrimmage game.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

John Manna, coach of the Nebraska White team, watches his athletes warm up. Manna, from Omaha, was active in bringing flag football to the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games.

Photo

Photo by Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

John Manna, coach of the Nebraska White team, shows off his New Jersey pin. Manna said the teams exchange pins as they begin to compete during the Special Olympics.



Tags: , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Can’t wait for Nebraska

June 30, 2010

Image Des

To many, Michael Jackson is still the King. And, after several years of thrilling crowds with his quick moves and winsome ways, he is ready to enter the spotlight once again.

No, not THAT Michael Jackson.

This other Michael Jackson is 31 and works in the mailroom of a large company near Dallas. And his stage will be at the 2010 Special Olympics Games in Lincoln, Neb., where he will compete as a volleyball player.

Like his namesake, though, he is a thriller. Jackson’s competitors know it, and he’s got the awards to prove it.

For the native Texan, however, the games are about more than bragging rights. They’re also about having fun, making friends and helping others.

Jackson is a leader on the volleyball court and helps to set an example for younger players. “He never loses his temper even when referees make a bad call,” said his coach, Sandra Boggs. “He’s just a really good person.

“All of the young boys say, ‘I want to be like Michael when I grow up,’” she added. “He has a truck, he has a job and he’s just so responsible.”

Jackson demonstrates that responsibility by delivering the volleyballs and nets to all of the games and practices at which he plays. That’s two games and at least one practice every week on his unified team.  Special Olympics unified sports teams mix players with and without challenges.

Fellow player Lisa Grantham, who is also the delegation head, remembers when she first started playing with Michael.

“We would call out verbal cues like ‘Michael be ready’ or ‘Here it comes.’ Now we don’t have to do that anymore.”

After honing his skills for the past 17 years, Jackson plays just as well as anyone else.

“It is very satisfying for us to win one game of three against the general population,” Grantham said. “And Michael is one of our best servers.”

Jackson currently lives at home with his parents, but Grantham said, “Our ultimate hope is that when people with disabilities move into group homes or on their own, they can play [sports] with others.”

That’s something Jackson can already do.

At the 2002 USA National Volleyball Tournament, Grantham said, Jackson did well serving and spiking. “He also won Most Valuable Player and Male Athlete of the Year.”

Jackson is reluctant to toot his own horn, but he has won awards during each year he has competed.

“Coaches from opposing teams have voted for Michael,” Grantham said. “He’s received such awards as Best Sportsmanship, Best Play on the Court and Overall Attitude.

“When Michael moves on the court, he can play well with others in several sports including pick-up basketball, bowling and volleyball.”

Jackson speaks positively about his athleticism, but don’t ask him what makes him different. “I don’t look at things as if I have a disability,” he said.

For decades, the term “mental retardation” negatively branded people with cognitive delay, mental and physical disabilities.  In 2004, Special Olympics updated its official terminology from mental retardation to “intellectual disabilities.”

Jackson is committed to excelling. “I don’t think I’ll stop competing until I’m 99 years old,” he said, laughing. “I love this too much to ever consider giving it up. They’re going to have to push me away!”

Jackson is delighted that competing in the Special Olympics has made it possible for him to travel.

“So far, my favorite place is Minnesota. The Mall of America was cool,” Jackson said.

“But I’m looking forward to Nebraska. I’ve never been there.”

Jackson is ready to play before the crowds in Big Red country. His co-workers, family and coaches support him, he said, and he’s excited about all that the 2010 Special Olympics will offer.

Jackson knows there will be great athletes on hand, but he is not intimidated as he prepares for the gold.

“Michael is just really special,” Grantham said. “He was born special.”



Tags: , , ,

Bookmark and Share

« Newer Posts