Videos

View More

Bookmark and Share

Praise for USA National Games volunteers

July 23, 2010

We are using embedded Flash videos please update your Flash Player. If using a mobile device you can access content from a mobile download located below.


download Download Video:mobilewebbroadcast


Tags: , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Tennis tournament going strong at Abbott

July 21, 2010

Photo

Justin McDowell, 35, of Wethersfield, Conn., gets help taping his racket from Don Richards, 51, of Houston Texas.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Haley Waggoner, 20, of Lincoln, Neb., gets ready to receive a serve during her match against Iowa.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Dale Armstrong of Sod, W.Va., prepares to ride off on his Harley after supporting his team.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Mark Mayse, 25, of Ottawa W.Va.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Nebraska player, Tina Maxwell, gets aide after overheating on the court.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Tracy Long, 39, of Iowa City smiles after being splashed with water in an attempt to keep cool.
Photo: Chelsea Coli University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Athletes show their pride at Opening Ceremony

July 20, 2010

Photo

The Special Olympics flag being raised during the Opening Ceremony Sunday afternoon
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Photos arranged by Chelsey Criner at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Find pictures of your state: (all photos are by students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Alabama
Photo by Andrea Evers
Alaska
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Arizona
Photo by Dora Lopez
Arkansas
Photo by Dora Lopez
California
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Colorado
Photo by Andrea Evers
Connecticut
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
District of Columbia
Photo by Dora Lopez
Deleware
Photo by Emily Sallach
Florida
Photo by Emily Sallach
Georgia
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Idaho
Photo by Emily Sallach
Illinois
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Indiana
Photos by Andrea Evers
Iowa
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Kansas
Photo by Emily Sallach
Kentucky
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Louisiana
Photo by Emily Sallach
Maine
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Maryland
Photo by Emily Sallach
Massachusetts
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Michigan
Photo by Andrea Evers
Minnesota
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Mississippi
Photo by Emily Sallach
Missouri
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Montana
Photo by Emily Sallach
Nebraska
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Nevada
Photo by Emily Sallach
New Hampshire
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
New Jersey
Photo by Emily Sallach
New Mexico
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
New York
Photo by Andrea Evers
North Carolina
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
North Dakota
Photo by Emily Sallach
Ohio
Photo by Dora Lopez
Oklahoma
Photo by Emily Sallach
Oregon
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Pennsylvania
Photo by Emily Sallach
Rhode Island
Photo by Emily Sallach
South Carolina
Photo by Emily Sallach
South Dakota
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Tennessee
Photo by Dora Lopez
Texas
Photo by Emily Sallach
Utah
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Vermont
Photo by Emily Sallach
Virginia
Photo by Emily Sallach
Washington
Photo by Andrea Evers
West Virginia
Photo by Chelsey Wahlstrom
Wisconsin
Photo by Emily Sallach
Wyoming
Photo by Dora Lopez



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Volleyball All Stars hit the court

Photo

Athletes on the White All Stars team celebrate their win.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Rory Fox, coach of the Red All Stars, claps for athlete Ryan Landry of Texas as he is introduced to the crowd

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

All Star Jackie Krei from Team North Dakota serves the ball.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Raishaun Holloway from Team Connecticut receives his certificate after winning the 2010 Special Olympics All Star volleyball game.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

High energy ignites the Special Olympics

July 19, 2010

We are using embedded Flash videos please update your Flash Player. If using a mobile device you can access content from a mobile download located below.


download Download Video:mobilewebbroadcast


Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Behind the scenes before the opening ceremonies

July 18, 2010

Photo

Behind the scenes at the Opening Ceremonies athlete Jarod Markley extends a hug to South Dakota Development Director Darryl Nordquist.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Michael Henrick waits withs fellow teammates from Team Connecticut before the Opening Ceremonies.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo

Athletes wave to the crowd while walking to their seats before the opening ceremonies.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Photo

Sid L. Scruggs, International President of Lions Club, is interviewed by Maureen Wurtz of the Special Olympics Documentation Team.

Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Tags: , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

Thomas plays to win

July 6, 2010

Image Des

Anthony Thomas likes to start each game from the back row, a position where he can scan the full court, size up the opposing team and spot the weaker, slower players—the ones perhaps silently intoning, “Please don’t let the ball come to me.”

So when he returns a volley or rotates over to the server’s spot, Thomas knows exactly where he’s aiming.

Elsewhere.

“If I put the ball over, I want it to go to someone who can hit it back,” explains Thomas, a player on Connecticut’s Special Olympics volleyball team. “You don’t go to somebody who can’t get it back. That’s not right.”

Compassion for the other team isn’t uncommon in the Special Olympics, where coaches try to stress sportsmanship and camaraderie above won-loss records . But Thomas’ friends say his good nature runs a bit deeper than that.

“Tony is such a sweet, lovable gentleman,” says Jamie Polk, wife of Thomas’s long-time coach. “Everybody loves Tony. He’s so social, so kind—he’ll do anything for anybody.”

Her husband, Greg, drew Thomas into Special Olympics in middle school in suburban Hartford. Now 27, Thomas has been playing volleyball for a little more than half his life, and those long afternoons of practices have him on the verge of three first-time experiences next year: Flying, visiting Nebraska and competing in the Special Olympics National Games.

Greeting a visitor at a fall regional meet in New Haven, Thomas is unwaveringly cheerful. After 14 years of playing, he knows the refs, the coaches, the players and families from around the state, and he rarely goes five minutes without hugging, fist-bumping or cheering someone. He is at home amid the noise and non-stop action in this large fieldhouse, where teams are ceaselessly switching on and off the four courts, balls are hitting the floor with thuds and thwaps, and the refs’ whistles reverberate off the ceiling.

Ducking the occasional errant shots from a nearby court, Thomas talks easily on nearly any topic: His job stocking shelves at Crown Market, a West Hartford supermarket; the grandmother who raised him; the small West Hartford apartment where he lives with Princess, his cat, and Kato, the parakeet he’s owned since 1996. He is comfortable speaking of his serious reading disability (identifying letters goes well enough, but deciphering entire words is tough) and his less-than-storybook childhood (he was born in inner-city Hartford, sees his father only occasionally at church and calls his teammates and the Polks his “real family.”)

His grandmother’s death three and a half years ago is the one subject that draws a pause.

“She’s the person who really got me to do things on my own,” Thomas says. She was the person who taught Thomas to pick up after himself, showed him how to challenge himself and how to be independent.

“When she died, it took a lot out of me. People told me I wasn’t the same person. Somebody said, ‘You should get a cat.’ I thought, ‘What’s a cat going to do?’ But I’ll try it and see what happens.”

Thomas got Princess, a stray saved by a rescue foundation. After months of skittishness and hiding, she gradually relaxed enough for Thomas to cuddle with her.

“Now she jumps up on the bed every morning,” he says. “She rubs her face on me.”

Princess was born without eyelids.

“I like to have a cat that’s handicapped. I like to give back. A lot of people looked out for me,” Thomas says.

On the court and on the sidelines, Thomas likes to look out for his teammates. He cheers from the bench on every play and calls out praise even more when his team is falling behind. As Coach Polk walks off after a loss in New Haven and mentions that another player had a rough game, Thomas quickly adds, “We all did.”

Greg Polk says that’s just Tony’s way.

“He’s got a contagious laugh that gets everybody else laughing. You can’t go to practice ever without laughing so hard that you start to cry,” Polk says. “He comes over to the house on every holiday, he’s part of the family 100 percent. He’ll call me on Father’s Day before my own kids do.”

Sarah DeGumbia, another coach , agrees that Thomas is a gentle man, but she emphasizes that he’s also a serious competitor.
“He’ll go for balls even when he might not be successful. He’ll run as hard as he can to get it, and he’ll yell, ‘Help,’ when he can’t,” she says.

With the Nebraska trip coming up next year, Thomas has set a goal: Lay off the mozzarella sticks that he loves. He’s 5-9 and well over 200 pounds. Some of the extra weight he’s gained in the past couple of years needs to go, he says. But carrying a
chocolate drink and an energy bar from the refreshment table, he acknowledges it won’t be easy: “I love to eat.”

Thomas has never been on an airplane or traveled outside the Northeast, so making the Connecticut team for the national Special Olympics means new challenges. He’ll bring along some of his favorite gear for his time on the court in Lincoln: The wristbands that a coach gave him to guard against hard-hit volleys and the worn white kneepads that he’s used since high school to make diving plays less painful.

And he promises to arrive with a competitor’s spirit.

“I have determination,” he says. “I try to see how far I can make it on my own.”



Tags: , , ,

Bookmark and Share